Blackpill

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The blackpill is a collection of uncomfortable truths about romance and dating. It has a large body of scientific evidence stemming from evolutionary biology and sociology.


Meaning of the "Blackpill" on Modern Forums[edit]

The way Blackpill is used on incels.is and braincels is slightly different from its original definition, in that it explains how they think women are being picky without referencing the original definition's talk about societal hardship/prosperity. However, the word is still sometimes used as a general expression of fatalism. Also, like the previous definition, it's usage on incels.is is typically centered in evolutionary psychology. The term 'blackpill' as it's used on incels.is attempts to explain romantic partnership as stemming from 3 interrelated factors:

1. Physical attractiveness

2. Wealth

3. Social Status

Five central themes about looks can emerge from this thesis:

1. Looks are necessary to the formation of physical or romantic desire
2. Looks are not distributed evenly among men
3. Looks are not subjective.
4. The Dualistic Mating Strategy
5. Hypergamy

Each one of the five central themes plays a part in deriving Incel Vocabulary. Looks being necessary,unevenly distributed, and objective provides two familiar categories: the Incel and Chad. The social role of looks is also reflected in the use of the label Stacy to denote a better-looking female. However, there is more space left for disagreement over what constitutes a 'Stacy.'

It is often suggested that the blackpill means that "it's over" for incels with a certain physical and social status - that is, that they have next to no chance of 'ascending' or attaining sexual and overall fulfillment. The 'blackpill' also forms a basis for the occasional semi-humorous spin-off that depicts a depressing human tendency, for instance the 'dogpill.'

Original Definition[edit]

The blackpill philosophy about society first proposed by a blog commenter named Paragon on the Dalrock anti-feminist blog in 2011 and later adopted by OmegaVirginRevolt's blog. In his comment, Paragon defines the blackpill to mean (paraphrased) 'there's no personal solution to systemic dating problems for men and only societal hardship (such as mass poverty) can solve men's systemic dating issues'. In other words, blackpillers don't believe that a sexual marxist, wealthy welfare state is possible. Paragon, having dating difficulties in Canada, moved from Canada to the Phillipines, a less prosperous country than Canada, and married there. Not all incels or incel boards promote or believe in the blackpill.

In paragons words:[1]:

to reconcile that there are no personal solutions to systemic problems – which can only resolve over evolutionary time.

And any solution will very much entail steep trade-offs, in that males can’t have their cake and eat it too – a prosperous population of deferred ecological pressures(like we currently enjoy), without an expectation that this prosperity will increase the mating latitude of females(dramatically perturbing the breeding population, to the point of near evolutionary instability).

One will always follow the other, as male consensus on these matters is practically impossible in terms of inter-sexual competition(as opposed to the broad accord females enjoy through an abundant wealth of sexual opportunities, courtesy of their reproductively limiting function).

— Paragon

Overview[edit]

Black pillers may feel that the most alluring aspects of the black pill, is that it gives people who are prone to gullibility an ideological basis whereby they could reject the barrage of "self-improvement" advice that is ubiquitous in media, advertising and in day-today platitudes. As such, it serves as a shield for people who may otherwise have faced financial or emotional exploitation.

The blackpill is corroborated by Bateman's Principle which suggests that hypergamy is innate not just for human females, but among females mammals and other vertebrates as a whole.

References[edit]

See Also[edit]