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A high-EQ personality is characterized by high adjustment, sociability, sensitivity, and prudence. High-EQ people have lower levels of creativity and innovation potential, difficulty giving and receiving negative feedback, reluctance to ruffle people’s feathers, a well-developed ability to manipulate others, and an aversion to risk.

A high-EQ girl can at first seem like a borderline personality disorder girl, but the difference is that unlike the BPD girl, she won't have sex with an incel. This is because her tendency is to resist her impulses and make measured decisions, rather than idealizing a man she barely knows and impulsively jumping on his dick.

Also, unlike BPD, having a high EQ is not considered a mental illness, because people with a high EQ can function quite well in society in roles that play to their strengths. They are less likely to engage in overtly self-destructive behavior; if anything, what will sabotage them is their tendency to err on the side of safety.[1]

CriticismEdit

Many contemporary psychometricians think the term 'EQ' is folk psychological, debunked nonsense. They think EQ term is hinting at something they regard as more scientifically consistent or valid, called the General Factor of Personality or GFP. A theory which also has its criticisms, particularly along the lines of allegedly being too political. Others concluded EQ strongly correlated with agreeableness and moderately with g, so it offers very little for predicting human performance over existing psychological concepts.[2]

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